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Learning High School Life Skills Leads to Success in College

When your teens graduate high school, they will need certain skills in order to manage their lives independently. Lauren Greenspan from Columbus School for Girls helps parents of teens understand which life skills are essential for success in college and life. She encourages parents to help their teen learning life skills in high school. “The only thing more dangerous than taking risks in adolescence is not taking risks.”

This presentation was part of Your Teen Magazine‘s College Event Columbus in April 2015. To see all the presentations from the College Event Columbus, click here.

Life Skills For Students: Prepping for Success in College

Excerpt:

So the majority of the time we are thinking about college, a lot of us I think it’s safe to say mostly think about how I’m going to pay for college, the application process, college application essays, all of that type of stuff. And something that can sometimes get overlooked is how am I going to prepare my kids socially and emotionally to completely uproot from everything they know and start another life. So that’s what I’m going to be covering today.

So, I’m going to start with just laying down a little bit of groundwork on some of the changes that are happening in the brain with teenagers that actually help to support them in this launch. And then we’ll talk about specific skills that we can help them develop throughout their Middle and High School Years to be ready for this. And then obviously we’ll talk about what we as the adults in their lives can do to help with all those things.

So the teenage brain. Anyone have any ideas what the teenage brain might have in common with other animals? This’ll be the day, right. Hormones, yeah. So there’re a couple changes in the human brain occurring during adolescence that I want to talk about. Very interestingly, scientists have found that these changes happen across species. You can see that not even just with mammals, with a lot of different species.

One is that we see increased risk-taking. And the other one is that we see our teenagers moving away from their family group and spending more time with their social group. And so scientists have found that as all of these different animals are preparing to leave their nest, they’re exhibiting similar behaviors. So this lowered risk threshold and the pleasure in risk-taking are actually serving a purpose across species. It helps animals prepare to leave the nest.

(To see the rest of this presentation, please watch our attached video)